Reputation
55,015
Next tag badge:
226/100 score
19/20 answers
Badges
10 156 241
Impact
~1.7m people reached

Jan
6
revised How do you validate critical input that cannot be vetted?
added 5 characters in body
Jan
6
answered How do you validate critical input that cannot be vetted?
Jan
4
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
1
revised What's the point of adding Unicode identifier support to various language implementations?
edited body
Dec
30
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
29
comment Why do we have postfix increment?
@Jerry: Fair enough. But on the other hand, two of these lines are braces, which means five lines of Actually Doing Stuff. When you've got one single line of code performing five distinct operations, IMO you're definitely getting into the Lisp/APL readability danger zone.
Dec
28
comment Why do we have postfix increment?
It's worth noting that his most expanded version, the one that most explicitly expresses what the code actually does, only takes 7 lines. There's no danger of running out of screen space there, even if you're coding on a smartphone. :P
Dec
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
26
answered How to treat “The field is never used” warnings?
Dec
23
revised Does open source licensing my code limit me later?
added 250 characters in body
Dec
22
answered Will correctness proofs of code ever go mainstream?
Dec
9
comment How was the first Malbolge interpreter tested?
@Williham: Depends on your interpretation. One might wish to test it to assure that its quality is as diabolical and its user experience as frustrating as possible. ;)
Dec
9
answered How was the first Malbolge interpreter tested?
Dec
9
reviewed Approve Finding all nearby points in a point cloud
Dec
8
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
7
comment What's your strongest opinion against functional programming?
@Frank: Because it was smaller, simpler, easier to read and maintain and ran faster on Python, apparently. ( aaronsw.com/weblog/rewritingreddit ) And Python is notorious for running slow, so if the Lisp version was even slower, that's not much of a credit to the language...
Dec
5
answered Does simplicity always improve Readability?
Dec
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
29
comment Why isn't literate programming mainstream?
To make it possible to have a single-pass compiler, all declarations had to come in a certain order. A declaration order like that certainly simplifies compiler design, but it doesn't enable/prevent single-pass compilation. Delphi, for example, doesn't have that order restriction, but it's still a strictly single-pass Pascal compiler.