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Jul
5
comment What OO Design to use ( is there a Design Pattern )?
Wow, you've actually come up with a legitimate use of Bar as an identifier!
Jul
5
comment Is committing/checking in code everyday a good practice?
@Oded: Yeah. Different perspectives. We've been around for over a decade and become the industry leader in our field. That's about as far from "green-field" as you get.
Jul
5
comment Is committing/checking in code everyday a good practice?
@Oded: Maybe. I suppose my response is colored by my experience on a codebase large enough that our developers (about a dozen coders on the team) all tend to have non-overlapping responsibilities. Not sure how different it would be on smaller projects.
Jul
5
comment Is committing/checking in code everyday a good practice?
If you've got a serious problem with conflicts and merge issues, it means your project manager isn't doing his job. Multiple cases involving similar functionality should go to the same developer, precisely so that you don't have two or more coders stomping each other's work.
Jul
5
answered Is committing/checking in code everyday a good practice?
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
3
answered I've inherited 200K lines of spaghetti code — what now?
Jul
3
comment Is it worth to learn Experimental Languages?
@DeadMG: Found it. scienceblogs.com/goodmath/2006/11/02/… Make sure to read the comments. I didn't remember everything exactly right, but the general idea is correct. And you can do encapsulation in any language, even plain C. (And C++ and Java are second-class citizens WRT encapsulation compared to Delphi and C#, due to the lack of support for Properties.) BUT LSP and inheritance are the only things that are unique to OOP and can't be done without it, which is what I meant when I said that they're the whole point of using an OO language.
Jul
3
comment Is it worth to learn Experimental Languages?
@FredOverflow: In C#, all objects are reference types. Structs can be value types, but objects can't, and this is for a very good reason: if objects get used as value types, you throw a huge monkey wrench into inheritance and polymorphism and end up having to use all sorts of ugly hacks like copy constructors, where assigning (or passing) a descendant object to a parent type variable doesn't actually assign that object. It completely screws up Liskov substitution, which is the entire point of using OOP in the first place. It's a horrible idea, and I'm glad it never caught on.
Jul
3
comment Is it worth to learn Experimental Languages?
@DeadMG: You're joking, right? I wish I could find the article now, but I read this thing a few months ago where a coder tears that notion apart. Basically, he was an experienced C++ coder who believed that, and wanted to see just how much faster, so he ported the same code to a handful of other languages, and to his shock, there was nothing he could do, no matter how hard he tried to optimize the C++ version, that would make it run even 1/3 as fast as the Caml, because C++ has language-level flaws that prevent certain optimizations from being possible.
Jul
3
reviewed Approve How do you manage your javascript unit tests?
Jul
2
comment Is it worth to learn Experimental Languages?
A significant percentage of the recent additions to the C++ standard only exist--like a significant percentage of additions in times past--to patch existing C++ flaws. Rvalue references, for example, add a bunch of extra complexity to work around a bunch of performance and complexity problems related to copy constructors, which only exist because C++ allows objects to be used as value types, which is 100% completely wrong and there's a good reason why no other OO language does that.
Jul
2
comment Is it worth to learn Experimental Languages?
If you're going to read Paul Graham's Beating the Average, (or anything else he writes on the subject of programming, for that matter,) take it with a grain of salt. A lot of the stuff he has to say about programming practice is 50% right and 50% dangerously wrong.
Jun
30
comment if you were asked to answer to the question “ what is the difference between the English language and a programming language” how you will respond?
@Scarfridge: The compiler is the formal definition. The language means exactly what the compiler says it means, and nothing else. Anything else--including a standards document written in a human language--is simply an attempt to describe the behavior of the compiler in an easier-to-read format.
Jun
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
30
comment if you were asked to answer to the question “ what is the difference between the English language and a programming language” how you will respond?
@user827992: No, pointers are not "scopes", they are memory addresses. They have a well-defined meaning: a pointer to an integer (for example) is the memory address of a variable that contains an integer. Scoping is a completely unrelated concept.
Jun
29
revised if you were asked to answer to the question “ what is the difference between the English language and a programming language” how you will respond?
added 192 characters in body
Jun
29
answered if you were asked to answer to the question “ what is the difference between the English language and a programming language” how you will respond?
Jun
29
comment Etiquette when asking questions in an IRC channel
+1 for the forums and mailing lists. IME they tend to be much more useful than IRC channels for getting technical assistance on a project.
Jun
28
comment Do higher resolution laptop displays matter for programmers?
Forget about resolution; if you're trying to do development in an IDE on a 13" screen, there's your problem right there.