46,316 reputation
8122206
bio website tech.turbu-rpg.com
location Seattle, WA
age 32
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 2 hours ago
A lifelong programmer who's been coding in Delphi since its initial release and currently makes a living at it.

Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
2
answered Why are off by one errors so common and what can we do to prevent them?
Feb
2
comment Is there a universal date format that anyone in the world can understand?
Seems to me that if there was one, you'd be using it and you wouldn't have to ask this question. :P
Feb
2
answered .NET Reflector is no longer free - how does everyone feel about this?
Feb
2
comment How to make profit from freeware application?
@blez: Well, if you can hook into Google Translate you can probably also hook into Google Ads, right? But Berry's right. Messing around with the user's configuration is a good way to get people thinking of your program as malware, so that's one good thing not to do.
Feb
2
answered How to make profit from freeware application?
Feb
1
comment Most difficult subject/theory in Computer Science?
Gotta agree with the Dragon Book criticism. It particularly bugs me the way Dragon Book does parsing and semantic analysis in three phases when they can be done much more simply in two.
Feb
1
comment Most difficult subject/theory in Computer Science?
@Martin: Well, considering that D is supposed to be a more evolved version of a language with formally undecidable grammar, I'm not surprised that writing a compiler for it would be difficult. The first step to writing a compiler easily is defining a sane language. :P
Feb
1
comment Most difficult subject/theory in Computer Science?
Compilers are really only difficult because most of the theory dates to times of insanely severe hardware constraints and a lot of the formal instruction hasn't advanced too far beyond that. Take a look at Let's Build A Compiler to see how easy compiler-writing can be if you approach it from a different angle.
Feb
1
comment Is learning how to use C (or C++) a requirement in order to be a good (excellent) programmer?
I must be missing something. What does Lisp have to do with learning fundamentals? It's the biggest abstraction inversion ever invented. One of its original, fundamental design goals was "let's pretend we're not really on a Turing machine and see how much we can simplify things by doing that."
Jan
31
comment Is there any express edition like thing in Delphi?
@qstarin: Check out the edit. While I'd enjoy seeing the price a bit lower than they set it at, Delphi is definitely a lot more affordable for learners now than it was yesterday.
Jan
31
comment Delphi doesn't have Lambda Expressions and I'm a Delphi programmer, what am I missing out on?
@Thorbjørn: Yes. They're called "anonymous methods" in Delphi, but they're closures.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@David: What does the file manager have to do with memory limits? And are you honestly saying you honestly prefer the model where every process on the system supposedly has the entire multi-gigabyte virtual address space to play with and ends up consuming a good fraction of it as often as not, leading to several seconds of disk thrashing for simple tasks like restoring a minimized window? I once heard, back in the late 90s, someone say that "every coder should be required to ensure their app runs properly on a 486." 486es are a bit more dated now, but I like the basic spirit of that idea.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@David: You say that like it's a bad thing. Memory limits are something I really miss. If Windows had that, there would be a lot less bloatware clogging up our systems today.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Jerry: How did you pull that off in Pascal? It's a lot harder to screw up because the length of the buffer is part of the parameter type and the compiler can apply bounds checking. (Unless you're working directly with pointers, of course, which 99% of the time you shouldn't and don't have to in Pascal.)
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Jerry: gets isn't the fundamental flaw I'm referring to; the buffer overflow in gets is, and the number of buffer overflow errors that have consistently shown up since then indicates that it's not as simple to write solid, secure software in C as you seem to think.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Jerry: You're missing the point. It's not the one specific exploit, (and IIRC the Morris Worm utilized more than one exploit to propagate,) it's the fact that the underlying language flaw that made the exploit possible cannot be fixed, and it keeps showing up even today, more than 20 years later, causing millions upon millions of dollars worth of damage repeatedly.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Jerry: You can call it "bigotry" if you want, but that doesn't change the facts, and the fact is that this has been known to be unsafe since freaking 1988!
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
WRT point 3, I will definitely assert, without qualification, that writing network-facing software in the C family is either stupid or evil, because it entails either unknowingly (stupid) or knowingly (evil) working with a system widely known to introduce security holes that will cause harm to your users. It's morally equivalent to giving a soldier body armor with a target painted on it.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Berin: Well, your experience was very different than mine. The only time I ever saw Mac OS Classic crash and require a reboot was when I was programming on it and did something stupid.