45,808 reputation
8117200
bio website tech.turbu-rpg.com
location Seattle, WA
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 1 hour ago
A lifelong programmer who's been coding in Delphi since its initial release and currently makes a living at it.

Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Jerry: You can call it "bigotry" if you want, but that doesn't change the facts, and the fact is that this has been known to be unsafe since freaking 1988!
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
WRT point 3, I will definitely assert, without qualification, that writing network-facing software in the C family is either stupid or evil, because it entails either unknowingly (stupid) or knowingly (evil) working with a system widely known to introduce security holes that will cause harm to your users. It's morally equivalent to giving a soldier body armor with a target painted on it.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Berin: Well, your experience was very different than mine. The only time I ever saw Mac OS Classic crash and require a reboot was when I was programming on it and did something stupid.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Charles: I didn't mean to imply that those are insignificant. Just that they weren't needed at the time, and when they were needed, they got added. Mac OS had virtual memory and pre-emptive multitasking by the mid 90s. On the other hand, the *nixes are just barely beginning to get good, workable UIs over the last couple years.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Charles: As for the 68k assembly, most of the OS was in fact written in Pascal, with QuickDraw being one of the major exceptions. On the very early models, the hardware was too limited to run the output of the pascal compilers they had fast enough to have a usable system, so they basically compiled the code to optimized ASM by hand.
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Charles: Your list of things that the Mac OS didn't have is a bunch of things that it didn't need. It was designed to fit the needs of ordinary users and make it simple to work with, which is far more difficult than building a system for other engineers like UNIX, VMS, etc. And yes, some of the underlying concepts came from PARC, but most of the fundamental UI principles we still take for granted today were Apple innovations, not PARC stuff.
Jan
31
revised Why are most browsers developed in C++
added 23 characters in body
Jan
31
comment Why are most browsers developed in C++
@Jerry: Or some flavor of Pascal in general. It tends to get the details that the C family gets wrong right, frequently before the C family gets them wrong in the first place.
Jan
31
answered Why are most browsers developed in C++
Jan
31
comment Is it OK to live without knowing how the program you created works?
Allocating fixed-size buffers for anything is a buffer overflow waiting to happen. Much better to use a language that supports dynamic arrays and let the callee manage its own buffers.
Jan
30
comment What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
@Testerab: I've never really understood the "each bug that gets fixed will introduce several more" idea. That has not been my experience at all as a software developer. The vast majority of bugs are caused by the coder overlooking something, which becomes obvious and easy to fix once you isolate it with a debugger. Less than 10% of fixes end up creating new bugs, usually just one new bug to replace the one old bug that got fixed. If this isn't the case where you work, something's very wrong with your development process.
Jan
29
answered What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
Jan
28
comment Why are a seemingly disproportionate amount of programmers just, well, not nice?
I'd say "whatever it is" is a simple matter of definition. Weird is that which is noticeably different from the normal, and brilliance definitely fits.
Jan
28
answered Why are a seemingly disproportionate amount of programmers just, well, not nice?
Jan
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
28
comment How would you decline to have your name put on a software patent?
@Orbling: I still say "sometimes," depending on how strongly you believe it. For example, I believe creamy peanut butter is better than crunchy, but I wouldn't turn someone down if they paid me to eat a sandwich made with crunchy peanut butter. :)
Jan
28
comment How would you decline to have your name put on a software patent?
Sometimes standing up for what you believe is more important than money. And this isn't likely to hurt someone's career. Hurt their prospects of remaining employed with that particular company, perhaps, but it won't magically make them unemployable at other companies.
Jan
27
answered How would you decline to have your name put on a software patent?
Jan
27
answered What is a closure?
Jan
27
comment Why do some programmers hate the UI part of the development?
@Chad: I had a "wrong shade of light blue" issue one time. After a bunch of nitpicking, I just took about 2 minutes to produce a gradient in Photoshop and send it to the client. "Please indicate which shade looks best to you with an arrow." They sent it back with a little red arrow pointing to the "good" shade. I implemented it like that and never had any more trouble with that particular issue.