Reputation
60,602
Next tag badge:
139/100 score
17/20 answers
Badges
13 179 261
Newest
 Good Answer
Impact
~2.1m people reached

Mar
9
comment How to save strings and integers permanently to a users device?
@kaio37k Any language you would use to write a server for anything else. AWS and Google Cloud are about hosting, not about languages or libraries.
Mar
9
comment How to save strings and integers permanently to a users device?
@kaio37k By "home server" do you mean "server run out of your home, on your personal Internet connection"? Those are problematic for a number of reasons, including because most ISPs prohibit them in the standard service contract you signed. For a small scale product, I'd set up the server on a cheap AWS or Google Cloud instance.
Mar
2
comment Would adding enums to my class make my code more compact or efficient?
Enums never make code more compact or efficient vs. using integers. (But they shouldn't make it less efficient either.) What they do is make it more readable.
Feb
28
comment Why is passing large anonymous functions as arguments to other functions so widely accepted in JavaScript?
@JörgWMittag Hooray for Racket, the official language sponsor of XKCD 927!
Feb
27
comment Why is passing large anonymous functions as arguments to other functions so widely accepted in JavaScript?
@JörgWMittag: They might, if they're completely ignorant of every major OO language these days supporting closures... :P
Feb
26
comment Why is passing large anonymous functions as arguments to other functions so widely accepted in JavaScript?
@RobertHarvey In other words, it's a workaround for JavaScript not having public and private?
Feb
19
comment What is the importance of WS-Addressing in SOAP?
The S stands for "simple"
Feb
12
comment For what types of applications is Python a bad choice?
@Sardathrion Not really. People do it all the time. I've done it. It's easy if you have a strict compiler: you do your refactoring in two steps. First, make your changes in a way that would break your compile, change your code so it doesn't break, and try to build. (Anything you hadn't thought of will fail to build at this point. Deal with it appropriately.) Second, undo your breaking changes before checking in the refactoring, because it's good to keep your changes as minimal as possible just on general principle. This technique is known as TCIYF. (The Compiler Is Your Friend.)
Feb
12
comment For what types of applications is Python a bad choice?
@Rook Maybe, but I'm a developer and I don't even tend to think of them as a software company. Intel builds chips AFAIK. (And occasionally drivers for those chips. They're notorious among gamers and game developers for making really crappy video drivers.) But do they really employ an army of developers on par with Microsoft? I've never heard that before.
Feb
12
comment For what types of applications is Python a bad choice?
@Rook That's interesting, but lacking context. Intel is mainly known as a hardware company, not a software company, even among developers. How many Intel compilers have you heard of? For me it's C++ and Fortran, and that's it. And in C++ there are lots of other compilers available, but I'm not aware of anyone else producing a Fortran compiler in this day and age. (There probably are a few, and I wouldn't be surprised if GCC was one of them, but I haven't actually heard anyone talking about it.) It's easy to sell lots of X when you're the only one selling X, even in a small overall market.
Feb
8
comment Can a tree be used to create a stack?
A set is not exactly the same as an array except without duplicates. An array is indexed in order, while a set is explicitly unordered.
Feb
7
comment Encrypted content in games
@immibis The thing is, you can't assume that. Somewhere in the world, someone is going to have the ability to crack it, and when it's cracked once and posted on the Web, it's cracked world-wide.
Feb
6
comment Encrypted content in games
@JonasDralle That's a disgustingly cynical viewpoint, and it's also not true. The strong, enduring community that got built up around Morrowind and Oblivion didn't prevent Skyrim from selling; if anything, it made it more successful!
Feb
1
comment Help in understanding computer science, programming and abstraction
@recursivePointer Was it the same algorithm, or did they just have a really ugly version in Java and a much clearer implementation in the Lisp one?
Feb
1
comment Help in understanding computer science, programming and abstraction
The problem with SICP is that, while it opens with the eminently sensible remark that computer programs should be written for people to read and understand as a higher priority than for a computer to execute, it then goes on to actually give a book full of example code in Lisp, one of the most ridiculously difficult-to-read languages ever invented. (Which was set up that way because the science of parsing--the formal theory involved in making text understandable to a machine--was in its infancy when Lisp was developed, so they sacrificed readability in favor of ultra-simple parsing.)
Jan
29
comment in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
How else is it possible to instantiate it, given the restrictions you set in your example? (Assuming Java or C#, with the way you wrote the sample code.) If there are no public constructors, then nothing but a static member of the class or its descendants are in-scope to call the constructor, and if it's a final class, there are no descendants.
Jan
28
comment in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
Meh. If something is a final class with no public constructors, you won't have much searching to do; the answer to how to instantiate it will obviously be on a static method within the class itself. The one you want will almost certainly have a return value of type Configuration. (And if not it will have a ref/out parameter of that type, or accept a list or other collection to put the new value in, but those are weird, uncommon cases; usually it'll be the return value.) Having declared types helps you easily narrow it down like that.
Jan
25
comment Should we avoid language features that C++ has but Java doesn't to increase maintainability?
"If you want code that's easy to understand and parse, go with LISP or whatever." I wouldn't agree with that. Lisp is trivial to parse, but precisely because of this--because it was created in a time when the knowledge of parsers and the principles behind building them effectively was still in its infancy, and so they punted and went with the most ridiculously simplistic thing that could possibly work--you don't get a lot of the syntactic benefits of modern languages. So it's easy to parse, but not at all easy to understand. There's a reason people call it "Lost In Superfluous Parentheses."
Jan
25
comment in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
You don't. That's the problem.
Jan
23
comment Why does integer division result in an integer?
@JerryCoffin Yes, it should be obvious, from my comments elsewhere in this question, that I'm quite aware of div and what it does.