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Nov
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Yearling
Aug
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awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
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awarded  Critic
Aug
7
answered Why does the Lisp community prefer to accumulate all the parentheses at the end of the function?
Jul
20
answered If an “either/or” algorithm is “Boolean”, what's a “zero, one, or many” algorithm?
Nov
2
comment Ideal programming language learning sequence?
True, Fred, and that's what I meant: taking advantage of features without thinking through how they work can introduce costs -- costs that you may have avoided before by avoiding the feature capability too, because it would have been prohibitively complicated or just insufficiently idiomatic to implement manually. For instance, complaining that RTTI is "too slow" immediately raises the question of how else you're going to solve the problem.
Oct
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awarded  Supporter
Oct
9
comment Ideal programming language learning sequence?
I proposed a very different order, but one comprising mostly the same choices. Your justifications are well stated.
Oct
9
comment Ideal programming language learning sequence?
Regarding the Perl recommendation: that's just me showing my age. Sure, today, Python or Ruby would be close substitutes, but both of them are more dogmatic than Perl, and more biased toward class-as-a-bag-of-methods-style object orientation that a new programmer coming out of C doesn't need yet. I recall that when I learned Perl, I was frighteningly productive immediately, and it wasn't for a long time afterward that I started using its object-oriented facilities. Too often, all that OO focus is just distracting and unnecessary ceremony.
Oct
9
awarded  Teacher
Oct
9
answered Ideal programming language learning sequence?
Oct
9
comment Why are strings so slow?
If you know that these "average operations" are mythical, can you at least tell us what some of them are? Given that you're asking such a vague question, it's hard to trust your assertion that these unspecified operations truly are mythical.