1,489 reputation
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age 46
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen May 27 at 19:30

Jan
23
comment Should I be wary of signing a non-disclosure agreement with someone I just met?
Most likely he just doesn't want people to blog about what he and his company is doing (and thus tip off competitors). A verbal gentleman's agreement to "be cool and not do that" should have been sufficient. Sadly, people resort to legal baloney because of the illusion of safety that brings. What they don't realize is that it turns people off, and fails to give any real IP security when it REALLY matters unless one has a retained legal staff that is able to be mobilized at great expense.
Jan
22
comment Job title on Curriculum Vitae
Yep, all three are usually identical roles.
Jan
20
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
18
comment Introduce the work of a software developer to school children using a social network
The PR guys are merely trying to prevent the wholesale alienation of a group of schoolkids within a 5 minute presentation and workshop. The PR guys probably have some excellent advice. It doesn't have to be about "facebook"-- but it has to be something the students can relate to.
Jan
18
answered Introduce the work of a software developer to school children using a social network
Jan
17
answered Keep it simple now, or program with the future in mind?
Jan
12
comment Are developers/programmers becoming a commodity in the IT world?
I believe that the only way one can become an effective BA or PM is by actually having a history of implementation work. Sometime in the 90's we started seeing people come straight out of college with good grades and excel spreadsheet skillz and going straight into analyst and then PM roles. I think this ultimately has lead to an epidemic of top-heavy org charts where very few people are doing the real work and everyone else is working like mad to "track deliverables". Dysfunctional IMHO. But I also feel sorry for PM's with no hard skills, they're in for a rough time if the economy implodes!
Jan
11
comment How do I approach a coworker about his or her code quality?
None of the defects you mentioned were especially egregious. Sounds like ordinary lackluster production code to me. They may be symptoms of deeper problems but those things aren't particularly horrifying by themselves. If you have a problem that is keeping you from making progress, then it is worth asking the original dev for help. Otherwise, not worth the hassle to get on someone's case about indentation and variable names and some inconsistencies.
Jan
11
comment How to react to wrong/not answered questions during interview?
@Nick, you have to check the squares of the sides for the three possible permutations. It isn't specified that "c" has to be the hypotenuse. And also, it would also be most correct to check that the integers are all positive!
Jan
11
comment How to react to wrong/not answered questions during interview?
+1 very nice answer. I think that the result of performance on such quizzes should only be "a factor" in deciding whether to hire. You could be missing out on some good internship candidates if you use this as a strict go/no-go filter. Interns are, by definition, trying out something new. Not only are they new to your profession but they may also be inexperienced at dealing with being put "on the spot". There is an emotional component to that and people handle it in different ways.
Jan
9
answered Resume dilemma for professional job
Jan
6
comment Should programmers be fluent users of office suites?
@SK-logic, the real problem with excel is that non-programmers can quickly become very good at it and then start to use it for things that are not advisable (the golden hammer syndrome). When this happens you end up with monster spreadsheets that suddenly become critical "enterprise" apps and major problems ensue quickly.
Jan
6
comment Should programmers be fluent users of office suites?
@SK-logic, it is fine to prefer other tools but in most work situations, you just CAN'T choose all your tools. If somebody sends you an excel spreadsheet and asks you do something with it, you can't tell them to send you a mathematica workbook instead because it is more "powerful". Excel is actually very good at what it does as long as the scope of the work is reasonable. Perhaps more importantly it is popular and a lot of folks are very competent with it.
Jan
4
answered How do you keep track of large projects?
Jan
3
comment How can I build this payment receipt/booking application?
OK, but why not just use existing software to do this? It would not be cost effective to develop such a stack and only use it for a few sites with one customer.
Dec
22
comment Using SVN poorly - is Mercurial the answer?
@ChrisS, the reality is we usually don't get to choose which version control system gets used. In many projects that decision was made a long time ago (perhaps before these newer systems even existed). And I, for one, am not going to try to convince a team that they should switch from svn to <whatever> simply because the ".svn" folders are annoying and git is cool.
Dec
22
awarded  Pundit
Dec
22
comment Should I not show all my skills?
The list of skills is merely what will get you past the keyword searches, and might get your resume a quick glance. The thing that gets you the interview is a work history that demonstrates you have what the employer is actually looking for.
Dec
21
comment Using SVN poorly - is Mercurial the answer?
Whatever version control system is used, I think it is important to "lay down the rules" and spend time to go over all the usage scenarios with your team. People aren't born knowing how to do branches, tags and check-ins, different teams do these things in different ways and VCS systems don't enforce one workflow over another. If the members of the team aren't all on the same page in terms of expectations and usage, version control becomes a nightmare. These are problems that are common to ALL VCS systems.
Dec
21
comment How to write a command interpreter/parser?
@SK-logic, yes, reading the dragon book in order to get a grip on how to parse command line args is an excellent example of what is known as "Yak Shaving". One could literally fly to Afghanistan, find a yak, shave it, and fly back all in less time than it would take to figure out cmd-line parsing "the right way".