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Sep
7
revised Alternative for Access+SQL Server for enterprise projects
added 1 characters in body
Sep
7
comment Is it okay to use a language that isn't supported by your company for some tasks?
+1, agree. I can see how this sort of thing can very easily happen but it is not necessarily "a bad thing" or "a mistake" on the part of the OP. It probably started when the OP was tasked with a "one-off" mini-project and he chose a good tool, python, to quickly clear his desk of the project-- but then found himself performing the task again and again...
Sep
7
answered Alternative for Access+SQL Server for enterprise projects
Sep
7
awarded  Commentator
Sep
6
comment How do you help your fellow programmers to grow?
+1 on making a distinction between doing a good job as a team lead and helping a team grow. The only thing I would add is to make sure that each member has opportunities to interact with other professionals OUTSIDE the organization. This can be done through workshops or conferences or other meet-ups. A team lead might not be able to directly make this happen, but they surely can influence whomever has the power to allow it.
Sep
6
comment Being stupid to get better productivity?
The problem of "over-engineering" is sometimes a manifestation of a requirements capture process that isn't working right. If you're struggling with "what-if's" and then answering them yourself WITHOUT the interaction of a stake-holder/client, that will put you in the position of predicting the future. Perhaps take some of that effort and put it back into understanding the requirements better before introducing more complexity into the code?
Sep
6
comment Should I judge an IT company by the look of the interior office space?
OK, but what about the condition of their tools/hardware/infrastructure and the morale and caliber of the people working there? Honestly, I have seen "opulent" workplaces where most people were working on single 17 inch CRT's (5 years ago!). If you're just disagreeing with the "interior design" of the place, I think that's a non-issue unless your job is to work with clients in that facility.
Sep
3
awarded  Critic
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
1
comment Is it common to lie in job ads regarding the technologies in use?
@desolate Yeah, that case certainly sounds like outright deception! Something is wrong with that place.
Sep
1
answered Is it common to lie in job ads regarding the technologies in use?
Sep
1
answered Basic features for a basic language? DSL suggestions?
Aug
27
answered Dealing with change requests from clients for an old system that only take 5 minutes to implement
Aug
23
comment Should I remove unreferenced code?
I agree the unused code should be blown away. However, deletions like this should be noted explicitly in release notes.
Jul
19
comment Why don't all companies buy developers the best hardware?
I think it is the manager's responsibility to justify the cost of adequate machines for his/her team. In the past I have found it useful to categorize computers according to roles. Computers used by developers and designers get classed as "for content creation". You just list invariably beefy application requirements for your shop's IDE along with some overhead and make a short list of acceptable machines from HP,Lenovo,etc. If this is not accepted and the team ends up with ridiculously under-performing hardware, the manager should really shoulder the blame for failing justify better machines.
Feb
14
comment Dealing with awful estimates
Sometimes people just make inaccurate estimates-- mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes, it doesn't mean they're incompetent or were forced to do it.
Dec
15
answered Metric by which to hold developers accountable
Dec
13
awarded  Supporter
Dec
13
awarded  Teacher
Dec
13
comment How can a new programmer impress the software engineer (boss)?
I know Ashton. He went to work for Delta airlines as a flight attendant. Eventually, he decided to impulsively quit his job at Delta in an even more dramatic, bridge-burning way than in furniture manufacturer-- he said "XXXX this!" and deployed the inflatable slide on the airplane to make his exit.