532 reputation
1814
bio website blogs.windwardreports.com/…
location Boulder, CO
age 59
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen Mar 25 at 23:00

I have a wonderful wife, 3 terrific daughters, and 2 great dogs. In my spare time I read history and blog on political topics, including interviewing many of the elected officials here in Colorado (from both parties).

I'm CTO & founder at Windward Reports

I've written operating systems (including on the Win95 team at Microsoft), games (including Enemy Nations), applications, firmware, and enterprise server systems.

For the last 6 years I've been in both the Java and .NET world, mostly server side for Java, and both apps (Office AddIns) and server for C#.

I've written a couple of books (including No Bugs! (free copy)) and numerous magazine articles.


Jan
29
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
20
awarded  Favorite Question
Sep
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awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
2
awarded  Good Question
Jan
28
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
28
revised Have you ever organised a “Code War”?
added 192 characters in body
Dec
21
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
12
awarded  Yearling
Dec
7
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
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awarded  Notable Question
Dec
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awarded  Yearling
Oct
6
comment Is it unusual for a small company (15 developers) not to use managed source/version control?
I've used it for all code, even hobby work I do at home. And it's always paid off.
Oct
4
comment What's the best way to organize our unit tests
Yes! And also where are the tests for any similiar scenarios. And from that we get the #2 need - reading what is covered helps us find what we've missed.
Oct
4
revised What's the best way to organize our unit tests
added 708 characters in body
Oct
4
comment What's the best way to organize our unit tests
Agree 100% on all you say (our build machine runs all tests on a check in). Our big problem is tracking what we are testing. And code coverage isn't a lot of help (see update above).
Oct
4
comment What's the best way to organize our unit tests
Which leads to the question, where do we store the table of tests? I'm thinking a spreadsheet in the root source directory???
Oct
4
comment What's the best way to organize our unit tests
We presently mirror the source tree. But we have two problems. First, for table formatting, there are over 100 different tests. Keeping track of what exactly is tested has become an issue. Second, very different functional areas need to test tables - the parsers, the data substitution, the formatting, and the creating the output document. So I think you're right, in a sense it is functional testing of a given property.
Oct
4
asked What's the best way to organize our unit tests
Sep
8
accepted What are good questions to ask a sales engineer candidate?