329 reputation
27
bio website linkedin.com/in/mikespross
location United States
age 29
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Jun 18 at 0:21

Software developer for a small software shop and lead maintenance programmer/bug-hunter for a fairly large legacy VB6 application with some VB.NET and C# mixed in. I've also worked in Java, C/C++, ASP.NET, PHP, and JavaScript, and have started playing around with Python and Ruby.


Sep
11
awarded  Yearling
Jul
28
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
27
revised What's the scariest piece of Other People's Code you've ever had to maintain?
added 3 characters in body
Jul
13
comment “A”, “an”, and “the” in method and function names: What's your take?
@Carson Myers Hah, that's a perfect real-world example of this. I must have suppressed the memories of the last time I looked at WordPress code :-)
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
14
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
7
comment How do you use blank lines in your code?
I agree 100%. Whitespace is useful when it's used to deliberately split code in logical chunks. However, whitespace for the sake of whitespace is just as bad as no whitespace. One former colleague liked to put one or more blank lines after almost every line of actual code. I spent a ridiculous amount of time "refactoring" that involved hitting Backspace a few thousand times to remove useless blank lines.
Oct
26
comment Which things instantly ring alarm bells when looking at code?
@Ken: I think I know that programmer. I see tons of blank lines and I know instantly who was responsible, and I know immediately where my next refactoring will be ;-)
Sep
16
comment “A”, “an”, and “the” in method and function names: What's your take?
@Naveen: I've worked with code like this, and the first chance I got I renamed all those methods. And I'm not sure if it was just the developer or not, but I think there is a tendency to make functions do multiple things when you write them as sentences, i.e. UploadTheFileAndProcessItAndEmailTheOrdersToTheCustomers, although hopefully nothing quite that bad in real life.
Sep
16
comment “A”, “an”, and “the” in method and function names: What's your take?
+1 for a good example of where prose method names can actually be beneficial. It's funny, because now that you mention it, I have done this specifically when writing unit test names, and specifically so I knew what the heck the test was doing when I ran them later.
Sep
16
comment “A”, “an”, and “the” in method and function names: What's your take?
A good example of why I dislike this approach so much! When I wrote the question, I was only focusing on the method names by themselves sounding like prose, but I agree with you: it's pretty hard to make the calling code actually read like prose, so no point in making individual function names sound like written English.
Sep
16
comment “A”, “an”, and “the” in method and function names: What's your take?
Hehe. I've actually seen "Teh" creep into method names following the "English-like" naming pattern. As for your second point: I completely agree, redundancy in methods names is another pet peeve of mine (File.UploadFileToServer...ugh).
Sep
16
awarded  Student
Sep
16
asked “A”, “an”, and “the” in method and function names: What's your take?
Sep
15
awarded  Editor
Sep
15
revised What's the scariest piece of Other People's Code you've ever had to maintain?
now with 50% more bullet points!
Sep
15
awarded  Teacher
Sep
14
answered What's the scariest piece of Other People's Code you've ever had to maintain?
Sep
10
awarded  Supporter
Sep
10
awarded  Autobiographer