Reputation
3,465
Top tag
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
3 16 25
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~86k people reached

Aug
6
comment Does W3C membership help future career?
@Peter - The important word in the phrase "Invited Expert" is invited. Sure, you can ask, but that doesn't mean they'll extend an invitation.
Jul
28
comment Does W3C membership help future career?
@Peter - The FAQ says: Some individuals who are not employed by a W3C Member may participate as an "invited expert" but in the general case, such participation is subject to approval by the group Chair and Team contact. I've looked through it (before today, even!) and I can't find anywhere that it says anything other than "they invite you."
Jun
14
comment What advantages do simple text editors like TextMate have over Eclipse for Java development?
It's worth keeping in mind that there's a non-negligible chance that TextMate will have problems with Lion (after all, there are still plenty of open Snow Leopard issues).
May
13
comment Thinking of switching from mac to windows, need a little guidance
@Paper - There's an app that's even more vaporware-like than TextMate? That's a scary thought…
Mar
29
comment What are the legal requirements for verifying a user's age? (United States)
Take a look at COPPA‌​, which did make it into law, and has been enforced.
Feb
19
comment HTML/CSS plagiarism
@Josh - Now that he's deleted the link, yes. Prior to that, well, the FAQ says that when you link to your own site, "you must disclose your affiliation in your answers."
Feb
18
comment HTML/CSS plagiarism
Max, it's against the rules on SE sites to spam mentions of your company and not include your affiliation.
Feb
16
comment Dealing with inflexible programmers
I edited the question to change "institutionalized" to "inflexible." Given that I initially looked at this question because I thought it was about mentally ill programmers, I figured it could use some re-wording.
Dec
18
comment eBook editions of programming books
@Robert - my money's on the "obnoxious DRM." I think that ① schools will want it because they'll save huge amounts of money in staff and shipping, ② teachers will want it so they can wait until the last minute to choose required books, and ③ students will want it so they don't have the hassles I covered in the answer. Publishers will get with the program simply because they'll lose the sale otherwise (and they'll like being able to skip the costs of printing, warehousing, and returns). Sadly, nobody asks the authors what they think… But yeah, expect draconian DRM.
Dec
13
comment What's the worst question you were ever asked at interview?
Reading back through some of the last 3 months of comments, I find myself wondering about the guys who got the impression that I felt "offended" and/or "sexually assaulted." As I never wrote anything along those lines, the best guess I've come up with so far is projection.
Dec
13
comment What's the worst question you were ever asked at interview?
@Scott - I never said I was offended. I said it was the worst interview question I've heard, as that's what the OP asked for. I also called it a stupid, discriminatory, and illegal question—simply because that's all true, and they're why it's the worst question.
Dec
9
comment What's the worst question you were ever asked at interview?
@Scott - I would have treated it like someone saying, "We don't want you to have any surprises, so we want to make sure you understand that currently our team breathes oxygen." Ummm… yeah? Who cares? Why did you think I might have an issue with that? Why do you think it's worth mentioning? And most importantly: is everyone being informed of this, or only particular classes of applicants?
Dec
7
comment JavaScript for a non-programmer
@kirk - I think you misunderstood @darwyn4. She said she learned about scope after recently starting JET — it was the ActionScript books that didn't mention the topic. And if you look at my answer below, you'll see that I mentioned where in JET I covered the topic.
Nov
15
comment What's the worst question you were ever asked at interview?
It might, in your opinions, be a perfectly good/fair question—but it's also a completely illegal question where it took place (in California). They would not have asked it of a man, which makes it gender discrimination. But the real issue I had/have is that it's a stupid question: what on earth could an employer learn from it? All programmers know the field is predominantly male; only an idiot would say, "No, I don't want to work in a group where I'm the only woman". Any woman who can't handle being in an otherwise all-male group needs to change careers asap.
Oct
22
comment Not-for-profit universities that offer computer science undergraduate degree online?
@Curtis - I don't understand why a reasonably-priced for-profit would have risk or trouble issues, but that's your call. I've added a couple of resources that you didn't seem to have yet. And btw, it's "Dori" not "Don".
Oct
21
comment JavaScript for a non-programmer
Given that they're both my babies and I shouldn't play favorites… I think that they're equally understandable. It mostly depends on what kind of learner you are.
Oct
21
comment Should source-code in textbooks and the like be translated?
What does the instructor expect you to learn from this? Yes, you might learn a little about Haskell, but it sounds like it's mostly a test of your English translation skills. Does he just want a translation for future classes, and he thinks wasting the time of all the students in this class is the way to accomplish it? My bet: all you'll learn is why translation is a specialized field best done by experts.
Oct
7
comment Is Linq having a mind-numbing effect on .NET programmers?
This question has overlaps some with The lifecycle of "cool".
Sep
26
comment How do I evaluate if writing a book, article, or presenting at conference is worth it?
@jblue: For book #1 in the mid-90s, I think that was just the publisher's then-default. For all my books since then (not just for that publisher), I've just said, "but I've always been able to keep my copyrights"—and they've rolled over.
Sep
24
comment What's the worst question you were ever asked at interview?
@HLGEM, @super - depending on the company, it didn't stop in the 80s, either. One boss (different co. than the one mentioned above) told me in the 90s that he didn't want to hire women, as they all took maternity leave and that left him short-handed. Note: the biz didn't have "maternity leave," it had "compassionate leave"; and in the previous year, the only person to have taken it was a man whose father was dying.